Latest News

A postdoctoral position is available in Dr William Cafferty’s laboratory in the Neurology department at the Yale School of Medicine to study the molecular mechanisms that underlie spontaneous recovery of function after spinal cord injury. Read more

Tim was elected to the Board early-2013, bringing not only clinical expertise but level-headed, insightful counsel. He contributed to build bridges with ANZSCoS, was a grant reviewer, was instrumental in successfully securing sponsors and exhibitors for Connections 2014 and provided help early on with the Registry. He retired from the Board in November 2016.  Read more

After retiring as Head of the Department of Anatomy and Director of the Neural Injury Research Unit at the University of NSW in 2008, Phil established and led the Spinal Network’s Research Development Committee. She then joined the Board in 2011 and was appointed the Chair in 2014. On 4 November 2016 she retired from the Board after serving her maximum period. Read more

Globally, a total of 25 study sites have been identified for the RISCIS trial, mainly in USA, of which 22 are open for enrolment.  Read more

PhD Scholarship

The Australasian Spinal Cord Injury Network is offering a PhD Scholarship through the Kevin Hortle Scholarship Fund to support research that aims to improve the bowel and/or bladder function for people with a spinal cord injury. Read more

Applications for conference travel in the financial year 2016/2017 have closed. Read more

Traumatic injury to the spinal cord generally results from fracture and dislocation of vertebra. Injury to the spinal cord occurs not just at the time of impact, but also as a result of compression of the spinal cord due to the displaced vertebra. Animal and human data demonstrate that urgent relief of compression appears to greatly improve outcome. However, urgent decompression in humans is difficult to achieve because of the time occupied by transportation, investigation, and stabilisation of the patient as well as the organisation of surgery. Animal data demonstrate that hypothermia can suspend the progressive damage caused to the spinal cord by compression thereby allowing decompressive surgery to be performed in a clinically achievable time frame. Read more

A report received by Dr Sridhar Atresh as follows: Read more